• Competitions Rules

  •  These notes are intended to assist players to understand the general concept of how various competitions are played. They must be read in conjunction with The Rules of Golf and in particular with any Conditions the Match Committee may lay down (See Rules 29, 31, 32 and 33).

  • Stroke

    Stroke:  Each stroke and any penalties incurred shall be totalled for each hole and recorded on the scorecard against the correct hole. At the end of the round the total for each hole will be added to determine the gross score. The player’s handicap is then deducted to determine their nett score.

  • Stableford

    Stableford: A player’s handicap determines her/his scoring capacity on each hole. A player will score no points for nett double bogie (and should pick their ball up once they can no longer score), one point for a nett bogie, two points for a nett par, three points for a nett birdie, four points for a nett eagle and so on. Where a point (or points) has been achieved the stroke score is recorded against the correct hole and the points score in the result column.

    For example, a player with a handicap stroke on a par-four hole will score nil for a 7, one for a 6, two for a 5, three for a 4, four for a 3 and so on. At the end of the round the total number of points is added together.

  • Par

    Par: Once again a player’s handicap determines the scoring for each hole. A player should only continue playing while there is the possibility of achieving a nett par or birdie or better. Once a player has achieved a nett bogie the ball is to be picked up. A nett bogie equates to a loss and is recorded on the card with a minus sign. A nett par equates to a half, recorded on the card with the correct stroke score in one column and a circle sign in the result column. A nett birdie or better is recorded on the card with the correct stroke score in one column and a plus sign in the result column.

    At the end of the round the plus, half and minus signs are acquitted against each other to determine whether a players has finished “up” – i.e. with more plusses than minuses, “square” – i.e. the plusses and minuses equal each other, or ‘down” – i.e. the minuses outweigh the plusses.

  • Foursomes

    Foursomes: The players play as partners and use only one ball. They strike the ball alternatively from the tee, i.e. Player A tees from 1, 3, 5 and so on while Player B tees from 2, 4, 6 and so on. Where Player A tees off, Player B plays the next shot and they then play alternate shots until the ball is holed out. Where Player B tees off, Player A plays the next shot and they then play alternate shots until the ball is holed out. Incurring a penalty does NOT alter the order of play.

    The total stroke score, including any penalties, is recorded and the score for each hole is totaled at the end of the round. The total is subject to the deduction of half of the combined handicap to determine the nett score.

  • 4BBB (or Four Ball, Better Ball)

    Foursomes: The players play as partners and use only one ball. They strike the ball alternatively from the tee, i.e. Player A tees from 1, 3, 5 and so on while Player B tees from 2, 4, 6 and so on. Where Player A tees off, Player B plays the next shot and they then play alternate shots until the ball is holed out. Where Player B tees off, Player A plays the next shot and they then play alternate shots until the ball is holed out. Incurring a penalty does NOT alter the order of play.

    The total stroke score, including any penalties, is recorded and the score for each hole is totaled at the end of the round. The total is subject to the deduction of half of the combined handicap to determine the nett score.

  • Ambrose

    Ambrose:  A team stroke event played by teams of two, three or four players. Each player plays from the tee and the team Captain selects the best result and each player plays their next shot from within one club length of the selected shot. The process continues until the ball is on the green or holed out from off the green. On the green each player plays from the mark of the selected ball.

    The team’s handicap is usually the total of the players handicaps divided by double the number of players, e.g. four players = 1/8th of the total handicaps.

  • American Foursomes

    American Foursomes:  Two players form a team. Each player plays a tee shot on each hole, and then plays a second stroke with their partner’s ball. The team then select the better ball and the partner of the player whose ball is selected plays the next shot. The alternate play continues until the ball is holed out.

  • Canadian Foursomes

    Canadian Foursomes:  Two players form a team. Each player plays a tee shot on each hole. The team then select the better ball and the partner of the player whose ball is selected plays the next shot. The alternate play continues until the ball is holed out.

  • Chapman Foursomes

    Chapman Foursomes:  Two players form a team. Each player plays a tee shot on each hole, and then plays a second stroke with their own ball. The team then select the better ball and the partner of the player whose ball is selected plays the next shot. The alternate play continues until the ball is holed out.

  • Par Bisque

    Par Bisque:  Players are able to choose to allocate their handicap strokes in any way they wish after the playing of each hole and before teeing from the next tee. The allocation continues until each handicap stroke has been taken. Players do not affect their handicap while playing Par Bisque.

  • Match Play

    Match Play:  A player plays his/her opponent using the Matchplay index (which at Drouin is the same as the Stroke index) on the card to determine where handicap strokes (if any) are to be used. Initially the lower handicapped player’s handicap is reduced to zero and the higher handicapped player’s handicap is reduced by the same amount – e.g. if Player A has a handicap of 5 and Player B has a handicap of 18 then Player A is reduced to zero and Player B is reduced to 13. Player B therefore has a handicap stroke on the Stroke Index holes from 1 to 13. If Player A and Player B are both on 5, they each have a handicap stroke on the Stroke Index holes from 1 to 5. The lowest nett score for each hole wins the hole. Where the nett scores are tied, the hole is halved. A match is won by a player who is leading by a number of holes greater than the number of holes left to play. Depending upon the rules of the particular event on the day, a match may be halved if the two players match each other’s wins, halves and losses over the 18 holes OR the match will proceed to further hole(s) until one player wins a hole.

  • Multiplier Stableford

    Multiplier Stableford:  Two players form a team and the Stableford score for each on each hole is multiplied – e.g. If Player A scores 2 Stableford points and Player B scores 2 Stableford points, each player’s stroke score and Stableford score is recorded against the appropriate hole. Their combined score, i.e. 4 (2 multiplied by 2) is recorded in the result column. Where Player A scores 2 points and Player B scores no points, the result score is zero (2 by 0 = 0).